dbair1967

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ya i dont know if theres a tell tale sign for oft injured guys

like ive always heard that repeated soft tissue injuries are a bad thing

not sure what wilson has been thru to this point

but at the end of the day, do i trust the cowboys team doctors ?? fuck no
In Wilson's case, it looks like it's torn ACL's. He had one in high school and a 2nd one as a SOPH. Although there are some websites I saw them say he had some hamstring and shoulder concerns too, and those are certainly very worrisome. We've been down this road too many time.

His JR and SR years he was healthy.
 

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As fyi, I just downloaded Brugler's Draft Guide today, havent went into it yet but will and will start posting some thoughts on it in comings days.

 
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As fyi, I just downloaded Burgler's Draft Guide today, havent went into it yet but will and will start posting some thoughts on it in comings days.
if you have some spare time, please post stuff from brugler's guide on players that the cowboys are interested in

this is the list of cowboys official 30 visits

Taliese Fuaga, OT, Oregon State
Byron Murphy, DT, Texas
Troy Fautanu, OL, Washington
Jackson Powers-Johnson, OC, Oregon
Graham Barton, OL, Duke
Darius Robinson, EDGE, Missouri
Kingsley Suamataia, OT, BYU
Edgerrin Cooper, LB Texas A&M
Payton Wilson, LB, North Carolina State
Ja’Tavion Sanders, TE, University of Texas
Junior Colson, LB, Michigan
Trey Benson, RB, Florida State
Jonathon Brooks, RB, University of Texas
Malachi Corley, WR, Western Kentucky
Braelon Allen, RB, Wisconsin
Bucky Irving, RB, Oregon
Matt Goncalves, OT, Pitt
Trevin Wallace, LB, Kentucky
Tyrone Tracy, RB, Purdue
Jordan Magee, LB, Temple
Rasheen Ali, RB, Marshall
Jase McClellan, RB, Alabama
Nathaniel Watson, LB, Mississippi State
Emani Bailey, RB, TCU
Giovanni Manu, T, British Columbia
 

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Jon Machota:

Dane Brugler’s annual draft guide “The Beast” officially became available Wednesday. While I was scrolling through the 324 pages, a Dallas Cowboys thought came to mind. Using Brugler’s final Top 100 ranking on Page 323, why not attempt to simulate what the Cowboys might do in the first three rounds, if that ranking is how the draft unfolded?

For example, make their first-round pick at No. 24 by removing the top 23 players on Brugler’s board. Any player outside of that top 23 is available to be the Cowboys’ pick at 24. We did that for Dallas’ first three picks, Nos. 24, 56 and 87. We then included some highlights about the picks that best fit the Cowboys from Brugler’s analysis of those players.

Here are the three selections we made.


-

Round 1, pick No. 24
Tyler Guyton, OT, Oklahoma

This was the easiest pick of the three. The Cowboys would have to be thrilled if Guyton is still there at 24. Left tackle is their biggest need, and they’d be getting a player many have projected to go in the top 20. Other notable players who were still available at 24: Penn State DE Chop Robinson, West Virginia C Zach Frazier, Missouri DE Darius Robinson and BYU OT Kingsley Suamataia.

Brugler ranks Guyton as the sixth-best offensive tackle in the class. The 6-7, 322-pounder played mostly on the right side the last two years. He started nine games at right tackle last season. One of the criticisms of Guyton is that he has only 15 career starts. Of course, there are going to be criticisms of any of the offensive tackles still on the board at Pick 24. And even more so if the Cowboys addressed the position at Pick 56 or later.

“Guyton is a work in progress in several areas,” Brugler wrote, “and a steep learning curve should be expected for his rookie season, but he has the athletic tools and fundamental skills to develop into a high-level offensive tackle. He has the talent to play left or right tackle, although his comfort level is clearly on the right side. As long as he stays motivated and healthy, he will continue on an upward trajectory.”

-

Round 2, pick No. 56
Trey Benson, RB, Florida State

The best players available at this point were Kansas OG Dominick Puni, LSU DT Maason Smith, Texas TE Ja’Tavion Sanders and Houston OT Patrick Paul. If the Cowboys had gone in a different direction at 24, Puni or Paul would’ve made more sense. Puni has position flex at tackle, guard and center but is expected to be an NFL guard. If the Cowboys had drafted a different player at 24, Puni could be the pick here with the idea that LG Tyler Smith could make the move out to left tackle.

Sanders is Brugler’s No. 2 tight end in this class. Had Jake Ferguson not stepped up last season and had Dallas not used a second-round pick on TE Luke Schoonmaker last year, maybe Sanders would make more sense. But a tight end seems unlikely with one of the Cowboys’ early-round picks.

This one came down to Smith or whoever the Cowboys see as the second-best running back in this class. In this scenario, Texas RB Jonathon Brooks was already off the board.

Drafting a defensive tackle fits a major need. If they feel like there is a quality starter to be had at this point, make that pick. But judging by the recent return on investment the Cowboys have received from their defensive tackles in the first and second rounds (Mazi Smith, Trysten Hill), we went with an instant-impact starting running back. Brugler has Michigan’s Blake Corum as his No. 2 back, but we went with the bigger, faster, younger player, Benson.

“Benson’s vision and run instincts tend to be spotty, but he runs hard off tackle with the burst and balance to stay afloat through contact,” Brugler wrote about his No. 3-ranked RB. “Cut in the Melvin Gordon mold, he projects best as part of an NFL committee, in which he’d have any-down and big-play potential.”

-

Round 3, pick No. 87
Wisconsin, C, Tanor Bortolini

There were three options here that all made some sense. Bortolini, North Carolina State LB Payton Wilson and Texas DT T’Vondre Sweat.

Wilson is Brugler’s No. 4-ranked off-the-ball linebacker. The position is one of the Cowboys’ biggest needs. But Wilson’s injury history could be a major issue for teams. Brugler wrote that Wilson has had double-digit surgeries (knees, shoulders) since his senior year of high school.

Sweat would provide Dallas with much-needed size in the middle. He’s 6-4, 366 pounds. But his draft stock could take a hit after he was recently arrested and charged with DWI.

Bortolini is Brugler’s No. 4 center with a third- to fourth-round grade. The Cowboys do not have a fourth-round pick. Will there still be a starting-caliber center in the fifth round? This isn’t to say they should force this pick just because center is one of their biggest needs. There could still be starters in the later rounds. This is considered to be a strong center class. But we decided to give Dallas its third consecutive center from Wisconsin, following in the footsteps of Tyler Biadasz and Travis Frederick.

"Bortolini, who broke Jason Kelce’s combine record with the best three-cone (7.16 seconds) among interior linemen, might have the best combination of athleticism and smarts in this draft class,” Brugler wrote. “He lacks ideal length to create separation and is guilty of excessive forward lean into contact, but he will strain to finish cutoffs and eventually settle versus power rushers.

“Overall, Bortolini had persistent hiccups on his 2023 tape, but the guard-to-center transition is rarely immediate, and he offers encouraging upside, thanks to his fluidity, intelligence and technical skill. He projects as an eventual NFL starter with position flexibility across the interior.”
 

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if you have some spare time, please post stuff from brugler's guide on players that the cowboys are interested in

this is the list of cowboys official 30 visits

Taliese Fuaga, OT, Oregon State
Byron Murphy, DT, Texas
Troy Fautanu, OL, Washington
Jackson Powers-Johnson, OC, Oregon
Graham Barton, OL, Duke
Darius Robinson, EDGE, Missouri
Kingsley Suamataia, OT, BYU
Edgerrin Cooper, LB Texas A&M
Payton Wilson, LB, North Carolina State
Ja’Tavion Sanders, TE, University of Texas
Junior Colson, LB, Michigan
Trey Benson, RB, Florida State
Jonathon Brooks, RB, University of Texas
Malachi Corley, WR, Western Kentucky
Braelon Allen, RB, Wisconsin
Bucky Irving, RB, Oregon
Matt Goncalves, OT, Pitt
Trevin Wallace, LB, Kentucky
Tyrone Tracy, RB, Purdue
Jordan Magee, LB, Temple
Rasheen Ali, RB, Marshall
Jase McClellan, RB, Alabama
Nathaniel Watson, LB, Mississippi State
Emani Bailey, RB, TCU
Giovanni Manu, T, British Columbia
Might split this into a few posts or so. I also included a few guys not on the 30 visit list because we've been pretty heavily linked to them.

Taliese Fuaga, OT, Oregon State: 4th OT, 17th overall:

SUMMARY: A two-year starter at Oregon State, Fuaga was entrenched at right tackle in former head coach Jonathan Smith’s zone-based run scheme. He became the starting right tackle prior to the 2022 season and finished his career starting 25 straight games, earning team captain and All-American status in 2023. Arguably the top run-blocking lineman in the draft, Fuaga is quick into contact and creates immediate displacement with his aggressive mentality and stiff, controlled hands. Though he has functional athleticism and technique for the edges, his first reflex is to use his hands in pass pro, which leads to him oversetting or undersetting versus pass-rush counters (and highlights his lack of elite range and length). Overall, Fuaga has only average play range and can be dinged here and there for minor flaws, but he has the size, core strength and balance to be a plug-and-play starter in the NFL (reminiscent of Taylor Decker). Some teams view him best inside at guard, while others want to keep him at right tackle (Duke Manyweather compares him to Mike Iupati

Kingsley Suamataia, OT, BYU: 7th OT, 40th overall

SUMMARY: A two-year starter at BYU, Suamataia lined up at left tackle this past season in offensive coordinator Aaron Roderick’s RPO offense, which utilizes wideand mid-zone schemes. Highly recruited, he had a short stint at Oregon before feeling “more comfortable” closer to home with BYU, where he played both tackle spots. His 1,342 offensive snaps in college were evenly split between left tackle (48.8 percent) and right tackle (51.2 perce nt). Suamataia played in an offense that wanted to run the ball downhill, and he was happy to oblige, displaying range and an initial pop as a drive blocker. He is nimble in pass protection with the strength to lock down rushers, but his timing, technique and recognition skills remain immature. Overall, Suamataia is still very young and lacks refinement in several areas, but his blend of size, mobility and core power are the foundation of a scheme-diverseNFL starter. He will require a patient coaching staff who can ease his transition to the pro level.

Troy Fautanu, OL, Washington: 1st OG, 9th overall

SUMMARY: A two-year starter at Washington, Fautanu manned the left tackle position in former offensive coordinator Ryan Grubb’s pass-centric scheme. After playing as a backup his first three years with the Huskies, he was an All-Pac-12performer the last two seasons and was awarded the 2023 Morris Trophy (as voted on by conference defensive linemen). With his lower-body agility and flexible hips/knees, Fautanu displays athletic muscle twitch in his pass sets and when pulling and locating in the run game. Although he needs to become more disciplined with his technique, he flashes violence with his hands and makes defenders feel it when he connects. Overall, Fautanu is explosive on the move and at contact with the foot quickness, body control and temperament to stack winsin both pass protection and as a run blocker in the NFL

Matt Goncalves, OT, Pitt:13th (has him rated as OG), 5th round grade

SUMMARY: A four-year starter at Pittsburgh, Goncalves bounced between left and right tackle in former offensive coordinator Frank Cignetti’s balanced run-scheme. After he earned All-ACC honors as a junior, he received strong draft grades from NFL scouts in the summer but missed most of the 2023 season and draft process with a foot injury. In pass protection, Goncalves plays with controlled urgency and makes good use of his physical, independent hands, although his average athleticism and high cut, upright playing style make it tough for quick recoveries. When he bends and runs his feet, he has the drive power to create displaceme nt in the run game. Overall, Goncalves has several skills that will translate to tackle in the NFL, but a move inside to guard as a phone -booth blocker should better accentuate his size, strength and play style. He projects as an NFL reserve who can provide depth at multiple positions

Graham Barton, OL, Duke: 1st OC, 18th overall

SUMMARY: A four-year starter at Duke, Barton was entrenched at left tackle in former offensive coordinator Kevin Johns’ scheme. The highest-ranked recruit in the Blue Devils’ class four years ago, he earned freshman All-America honors as a center in 2020 and started 34 games at left tackle over the last three seasons, earning All-America honors in 2023. As a run blocker, Barton plays with the athletic control, core strength and stubborn mentality to exe cute his assignments. His movements and finishing skills also translate to pass protection, but he will struggle cutting off NFL speed and needs to improve his punch timing to stay ahead of schedule (and avoid penalties). Overall, Barton will have adjustments to make as he moves inside, but he has athletic feet and strong hands and works hard to stay attached to blocks through the whistle. He projects as an above-average NFL starter at guard or center (reminiscent of Alijah Vera-Tucker).

Jackson Powers-Johnson OC Oregon: 2nd C, 23rd overall

SUMMARY: A one-year starter at Oregon, Powers-Johnson emerged as a standout center this past season in offensive coordinator Will Stein’s zone -read, balanced attack. After filling in at guard his first two seasons, he won the starting center job in 2023 and became the fifth unanimous All-American in school history and first Pac-12 player to win the Rimington Award as the nation’s top center. A multi-sport athlete growing up, Powers-Johnson plays light on his feet in pass protection and as a run blocker,with the natural movement skills and stability at contact to torque and fend off defenders. With his contact balance and comp osure, he rarely appears overwhelmed on tape, although the defensive line play in the NFL is a giant leap ahead of what he saw in the Pac -12. Overall, Powers-Johnson’s inexperience is reflected in his technique, but he offers a fantastic combination of size, athleticism and toughness, with the skill set that translates to both center and guard. His game reminds me of Ryan Kelly, who won the Rimington Award at Alabama before becoming a first-round pick in 2016.

Tyler Guyton OT Oklahoma: 6th OT, 27th overall

SUMMARY: A two-year starter at Oklahoma, Guyton was the starting right tackle in former offensive coordinator Jeff Lebby’s inside -zone, gap-focused scheme. A basketball-focused athlete much of his life, he moved to the offensive line while at TCU and later developed into a starter for the Sooners, protecting Dillon Gabriel’s blindside at right tackle. A nimble big man, Guyton stays square to pass rushers with balanced lateral steps to easily redire ct, and he does a great job working into open space with remarkable range (NFL scout: “The OU coaches just marvel at him. They call him different than everyone else they’ve had.”). He stays controlled with his punch to be a sticky blocker, although his accuracy and fit entry are underdeveloped, and his overall timing is not yet a strength to his game. Overall, Guyton is a work in progress in several areas and a steep learning curve should be expected for his rookie season, but he has the athletic tools and fundamental skills to develop into a high-level offensive tackle. He has the talent to play left or right tackle, although his comfort level is clearly on the right side . As long as he stays motivated and healthy, he will continue on an upward trajectory.

Jordan Morgan, OG Arizona: 2nd OG, 28th overall

SUMMARY: A four-year starter at Arizona, Morgan was a constant at left tackle in offensive coordinator Brennan Carroll’s zone -based scheme (Carroll is the son of Pete Carroll and was the assistant offensive line coach for the Seattle Seahawks from 2015-21). After Arizona won a combined five games during his first three seasons on campus, Morgan helped lead the program’s turnaround in 2023 (Arizona won 10 games in a season for just the second time since 1998). A quick-footed blocker, Morgan displays range and aggression in the run game and gets on top of rushers quickly in his jump sets when he uses well-timed hands. His struggles in pass protection come when he is overaggressive with his kickslide and gets too far up the arc, which can create a two-way go for rushers and open the door for inside counters. Overall, Morgan struggles to anchor mid-slide versus power, but he is a balanced mover who is well-schooled and physical in all phases. Though he can survive at tackle in the NFL, his skill set projects much better inside at guard, similar to Matthew Bergeron. (my note here, Cowboy scouts loved Bergeron last yr and he was nearly our top pick)
 

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if you have some spare time, please post stuff from brugler's guide on players that the cowboys are interested in

this is the list of cowboys official 30 visits

Taliese Fuaga, OT, Oregon State
Byron Murphy, DT, Texas
Troy Fautanu, OL, Washington
Jackson Powers-Johnson, OC, Oregon
Graham Barton, OL, Duke
Darius Robinson, EDGE, Missouri
Kingsley Suamataia, OT, BYU
Edgerrin Cooper, LB Texas A&M
Payton Wilson, LB, North Carolina State
Ja’Tavion Sanders, TE, University of Texas
Junior Colson, LB, Michigan
Trey Benson, RB, Florida State
Jonathon Brooks, RB, University of Texas
Malachi Corley, WR, Western Kentucky
Braelon Allen, RB, Wisconsin
Bucky Irving, RB, Oregon
Matt Goncalves, OT, Pitt
Trevin Wallace, LB, Kentucky
Tyrone Tracy, RB, Purdue
Jordan Magee, LB, Temple
Rasheen Ali, RB, Marshall
Jase McClellan, RB, Alabama
Nathaniel Watson, LB, Mississippi State
Emani Bailey, RB, TCU
Giovanni Manu, T, British Columbia
For some reason, my PW is not being accepted any longer and now I am locked out even though I am a paying subscriber.
 

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LB's from Brugler:

Edgerrin Cooper, LB Texas A&M: 2nd LB, 46th overall

SUMMARY: A two-year starter at Texas A&M, Cooper lined up as a Will linebacker in defensive coordinator DJ Durkin’s 4-2-5 base scheme, also seeing snaps wide as a nickel or on the defensive line. Although 2023 was a forgettable season for the program, the Aggies’ defense ranked top 10 nationally and Cooper was the catalyst, leading the team in tackles, tackles for loss, sacks and forced fumbles (only prospect in this class who can say that). An above-average athlete for his size, Cooper beelines to the football with outstanding closing burst and aggressive tackling. Though he has elite arm length, he can be better at shooting his hands to escape blocks. Overall, Cooper has some undisciplined tendencies and will run himself out of plays, but he is a fast-flowing linebacker who can run and cover. He has the explosive traits to be a regular on special teams as a rookie and grow into a three -down linebacker role in the NFL.

Junior Colson, LB, Michigan: 1st LB, 42nd overall

SUMMARY: A three-year starter at Michigan, Colson played the Mike linebacker role in former defensive coordinator Jesse Minter’s 4-2-5 scheme. The leader of the No. 1 defense in college football in 2023, he was voted the team’s Defensive MVP and won the Toughest Player Award, posting outstanding production in Ann Arbor with 196 tackles over the last two seasons (59 more than the second-leading tackler for the Wolverines over that span). Colson diagnoses the action well and quickly builds his speed to make stops at the line of scrimmage or out in space. He needs to continue honing his take-on timing and man-coverage anticipation, but he has an outstanding batting average as a tackler— and I only need one hand to count the missed tackles I charted from his 2023 tape. Overall, Colson checks a lot of boxes for the next level with his physicality downhill, athleticism in space and iron-man toughness that he brings to work every day. He projects as an NFL starting MIKE early in his career and a more complete version of Derrick Barnes of the Detroit Lions

Payton Wilson, LB, North Carolina State: 4th LB, 88 overall

SUMMARY: A four-year starter, Wilson played weakside linebacker in defensive coordinator Tony Gibson’s 3-3-5 stack scheme. After returning for a sixth year in Raleigh, he put together his most complete season in 2023 with 11.5 tackles per game (fifth best in the FBS) and cleaned up on the award circuit, taking home the Butkus (nation’s top linebacker) and Chuck Bednarik (nation’s top defensive player) awards (first in NC State history to win either honor). Against run or pass, Wilson is quick to trigger (downhill and laterally) and has some impressive GPS numbers for both his speed and the ground covered on plays. Although he is an average takeon player and can be late escaping blocks, he never shuts it down and competes with the “every play could be my last” mentality. Overall, Wilson’s medicals will be a key factor in his final grade, but he is a rangy and instinctive player

Trevin Wallace, LB, Kentucky: 4th LB, 86 overall

SUMMARY: A two-year starter at Kentucky, Wallace played Will linebacker in defensive coordinator Brad White’s 4-2-5 base scheme. The top-ranked recruit in the Wildcats’ 2021 class, he made steady strides each of the last three seasons and ranked top 10 in the SEC with 6.7 tackles per game in 2023. A balanced athlete in space, Wallace has the speed to pursue plays all over the field and is one of the best linebackers in this class at mirroring backs to the sideline when plays flow wide. Though not super instinctive versus the run or pass, he follows basic keys to the spot and has the athletic range to stay on the field on third down. Overall, Wallace has an attractive collection of traits for today’s NFL, however, the parts are better than the whole at this point and pro coaching will need to get him across the finish line. With more seasoning, he has the talent to compete for starting reps

Jordan Magee, LB, Temple: 8th LB, 4th/5th rd grade

SUMMARY: A three-year starter at Temple, Magee was the Mike linebacker in defensive coordinator Everett Withers’ 4-2-5 base scheme. A high school quarterback, he fully transitioned to linebacker for the Owls, leading the team in tackles each of the last two seasons and earning a single-digit jersey number as a two-time captain. Although anticipation isn’t a true strength of his game, Magee trusts his keys and flies to the football once he loc ks onto his target. However, he feels small working downhill and his take-on skills leave a lot to be desired, which is why he projects to be more of a Will in the NFL. Overall, Magee’s average play strength will stand out versus pro competition, but his athletic range and competitive play style are NFL-quality assets. He should be an outstanding special teamer as a rookie while he competes for defensive snaps
 

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Brugler on the RB's, overall it doesn't seem like he really likes this class of RB that much. Especially in terms of finding "THE" guy as a top #1 back.

Jonathon Brooks, RB, University of Texas: 1st RB, 48 overall

SUMMARY: A one-year starter at Texas, Brooks emerged as the Longhorns’ go-to back in head coach Steve Sarkisian’s spread RPO offense, which utilizes both zone and gap principles. After two years behind Bijan Robinson and Roschon Johnson, he put together an All-America-level season in 2023 prior to suffering a torn ACL (ranked top five in the FBS in rushing at the time of his injury). Despite a wide gait and long legs, Brooks is a controlled, instinctive runner who forces missed tackles with his subtle ability to set up defenders and string together moves with timely, sharp cuts. He can be inconsistent in short-yardage situations but offers third-down value with his promise as a blocker and natural pass-catching traits. Overall, Brooks is a springy, balanced athlete with a feel for lane development and the elusive traits to create his own yardage, both at the line of scrimmage and on the second level. Stylistically, he reminds me of Kenyan Drake, although Brooks has much better vision and big-play potential (assuming he returns to his pre-injury form).

Trey Benson, RB, Florida State: 3rd RB, 81st overall

SUMMARY: A two-year starter at Florida State, Benson was the lead back in head coach Mike Norvell’s up-tempo offense with mostly gap-scheme runs. After two seasons (and a major injury) at Oregon, he was consistently productive the past two seasons in Tallahassee, averaging 6.1 yards per carry over his Seminoles’ career. He also scored three touchdowns of 80-plus yards (in three different ways). Benson, who models his game after Adrian Peterson, runs with the plant-and-go explosiveness and run strength to rarely go down on initial contact and forces some missed tackles that defy gravity. Because the Florida State offense was committed to its package for backup running back Lawrance Toafili, Benson averaged just 13.5 offensive touches per game in 2023, but he showed key improvements as both a pass catcher and blocker. Overall, Benson’s vision and run instincts tend to be spotty, but he runs hard off tackle with the burst and balance to stay afloat through contact. Cut in the Melvin Gordon mold, he projects best as part of an NFL committee, in which he’d have any-down and big-play potential.

Braelon Allen, RB, Wisconsin: 6th RB, 97st overall (Brugler note, Allen is the youngest player in the draft and will be 20 yrs old for entire rookie season)

SUMMARY: A three-year starter at Wisconsin, Allen was the focal point of offensive coordinator Phil Longo’s multiple-run scheme. After signing as a safety/linebacker out of high school (at age 16), he stayed on offense and led the Badgers in rushing each of his three seasons in Madison, including 20 career 100-yard rushing games, the most of any active college player in 2023. (Wisconsin was 18-2 in those games). A balanced, one-cut athlete, Allen shows a great feel for lane development, especially on inside/outside zone. He can run with either finesse or physicality, depending on the situation (69.5 percent of his yardage came after contact in 2023). He needs to prove his reliability (ball security, durability), but he plays through pain, and NFL teams love that he is the youngest player in this draft class. Overall, Allen isn’t overly creative and doesn’t run with as much nastiness as his size suggests, but he is well built with the vision, feet and overall feel to maximize the run design. He has the talent and third-down potential to be a productive NFL tandem back, similar to Tyler Allgeier.

Bucky Irving, RB, Oregon: 8th RB,3rd/4th rd grade

SUMMARY: A two-year starter at Oregon, Irving was the lead back in offensive coordinator Will Stein’s zone -read, balanced run attack. After leaving Minnesota following one season for more offensive touches, he surpassed 1,000 yards rushing in each of his two seasons in Eugene and led all FBS running backs in catches (56) in 2023. With his vision, darting quickness and wiggle in the hole, Irving routinely finds yards that aren’t blocked for him. Al though he will have a tougher time churning out yards after contact in the NFL, his body balance and low center of gravity are assets — especially out in space. Overall, Irving is undersized and underpowered, but he has pass-catching skills and instinctive run qualities to quickly sort and make sharp directional cuts to daylight. He projects as an NFL complementary back who can be a productive changeup in a committee (like former North Carolina RB Michael Carter).

Tyrone Tracy, RB, Purdue: 11th RB, 4th rd grade (Brugler note, will turn 25 during rookie season)

SUMMARY: A two-year starter at Purdue, Tracy played a “WideBack” position in offensive coordinator Graham Harrell’s scheme, which utilized h is skills as both a running back and wide receiver. After four seasons as a receiver at Iowa, his versatility as ball carrie r blossomed in West Lafayette, and in 2023 he led the Big Ten in rushing yards per carry (6.34). Displaying natural instincts with the ball in his hands, Tracy runs with the dynamic agility and elusiveness to slip tackles from different angles (21.9 percent of his carries in 2023 resulted in a 10-plus-yard run, which ranked top five in the FBS). However, his inexperience at running back shows in his sporadic tendencies when choosing run lanes. Overall, Tracy needs to improve his decision-making at the line of scrimmage, but he can create with his quick lateral cuts and contact balance — and he can stay on the field on passing downs. He is a multi-dimensional threat as a rusher, receiver and special teamer, which increases his chances of commanding an NFL roster spot

Rasheen Ali, RB, Marshall: 13th RB, 5th rd grade

UMMARY: A two-year starter at Marshall, Ali was productive (when on the field) in former offensive coordinator Clint Trickett’s balanced run scheme. The lowestranked recruit (No. 28 out of 28) in the Thundering Herd’s 2019 class, he had a breakout season in 2021 (led FBS in rushing touchdowns) and returned from injury to have another productive season in 2023 (40 total touchdowns in his two healthy seasons). With his body control and speed, Ali can maneuver his way to daylight and BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS 34 create explosive plays — he ranked No. 1 in the FBS with seven plays of 50-plus yards (six rushes, one reception) in 2023. He runs tough, but he also runs elevated for his size. That issue exposes the ball and his body and doesn’t generate maximum power through his lower half, limiting his yards after contact. Overall, Ali needs to improve his forward lean as a runner, as well as his ball security and blocking, but he has burst in his lower half with a breakaway gear once he feels an opening. He projects best in a zone-blocking scheme and has some Marlon Mack to his game, although durability is the key to his NFL future. GRADE: 5th Round

Jase McClellan, RB, Alabama: 22nd RB, 7th rd/PFA grade

SUMMARY: A one-year starter at Alabama, McClellan became the featured runner as a senior in offensive coordinator Tommy Rees’ multiple run scheme. After playing behind Najee Harris, Brian Robinson and Jahmyr Gibbs, he finally got his chance — although, he turned in average results with just two 100-yard rushing games as he battled a foot injury. McClellan is a tough, physical runner with urgency through lanes when he sees daylight but some indecisiveness when the entry isn’t as clean. Though he has quick acceleration through the hole, he had a tough time finding explosive plays the last two seasons, with just 11 of his 292 carries (3.6 BACK TO TABLE OF CONTENTS 41 percent) going for 20-plus yards. Overall, McClellan lacks a true distinguishing trait to separate him in this running back class, but he has functional size, quickness and contact balance to be a quality backfield option if given the chance. His development as a receiver and blocker might be the difference in whether or not he can claim a permanent NFL role.

Emani Bailey, RB, TCU: 23rd RB, 7th rd/PFA grade

SUMMARY: A one-year starter at TCU, Bailey shined as a senior in offensive coordinator Kendal Briles’ up-tempo spread attack, which featured zone concepts. After playing a reserve role on the 2022 squad that advanced to the national championship, Bailey took over for Kendre Miller and Emari Demercado and averaged 100.8 rushing yards per game in 2023 (one of nine Power 5 players to average triple-digit rush yards). With his quick-scan reads and short-area burst, Bailey can pick, slide and make defenders miss with sudden gear change. Though he runs determined, he isn’t threatening on downhill runs and needs to become a more diverse receiver and pass blocker to earn the trust of NFL coaches on passing downs. Overall, Bailey might not have ideal size or run power, but he easily strings moves together to create yardage in space and is dangerous when he works in concert with his blockers. His game reminds me of Eric Gray — another former Big 12 back, who was selected in the fifth round in the 2023 NFL Draft
 

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Louis Reddick:

So here are my Day 1 favorites and some players to watch on Days 2-3. My 2023 list had C.J. Stroud on it, and I have another quarterback leading the way in 2024.

MY FAVORITE DAY 1 PROSPECTS

Jayden Daniels, QB, LSU

Daniels is the best quarterback in the draft -- and that list includes USC's Caleb Williams. Don't believe me? Let's start with the numbers. Last season, Daniels was first in the nation in Total QBR (95.6), first in QBR outside the pocket (98.8), first in QBR against zone coverage (98.3), first in QBR on play-action (93.8), first in QBR on deep balls (99.7) and second in QBR while under pressure (78.6). He threw 40 touchdown passes, ran for 10 more scores and had only four interceptions. And that's just for starters.

At 6-foot-4 and 210 pounds, he has just begun to grow into his frame. I see great decision-making, arm strength, touch and accuracy as a passer that will translate to the NFL. And on top of all that, Daniels is the kind of dual-threat runner who can change a game with his top-end speed and elusiveness once he breaks contain and gets into the open field. He is a student of the game, and I expect him to become a dynamic player in today's NFL.

Malik Nabers, WR, LSU
Before the 2023 season began, the draft class's receiver rankings were essentially Ohio State's Marvin Harrison Jr. and then everyone else. Now? There are suddenly many evaluators who feel Nabers has passed Harrison as the best WR in the 2024 draft. I won't go that far, but I do love his game. Nabers caught 89 passes for 1,569 yards and 14 touchdowns last season.

He is a do-it-all WR in a running back's body, having lower-body explosiveness (42-inch vertical at his pro day), speed (4.40-second 40-yard dash) and power that remind one of former LSU WR Ja'Marr Chase. And Nabers is just as capable of winning on short routes out of the slot with his smooth release, contested-catch strength and ability to break tackles as he is when aligned outside and running the deep posts, sails and go routes. At 6-foot and 199 pounds, he can simply outrun corners in the deep part of the field and make the big plays that change games in the blink of an eye.

Taliese Fuaga, OT, Oregon State
This guy is absolutely dominant in every way you want an offensive tackle to be dominant. Fuaga has great 6-foot-6, 324-pound size, and I see the functional strength and agility/body control to get movement at the point of attack in the run game on the line of scrimmage. And after running a 5.13 in the 40-yard dash, he can also get out in space and put linebackers or safeties on their backs with his explosive blocking ability.

Fuaga can dance with the very best finesse pass-rushers and match them step for step as they try to work his edges with their hands and counter moves. And we also see him set an anchor against power rushers and shut them down in their tracks with his lower-body strength on tape. He allowed just one sack over his 25-start college career. Fuaga will be an All-Pro in a very short period of time in the NFL -- count on it.

Nate Wiggins, CB, Clemson
Long, tall, rangy and competitive with blazing speed and the ability to match any type of receiver. That sums up Wiggins. I'm not worried in the least about his weight -- he measured 6-foot-1 and 173 pounds at the combine -- as he will get bigger and stronger, and he is already a pure alpha competitor who will not back down against any WR nor shy away from contact as a run defender.

Wiggins can press, he can play off-coverage, he can play zone or he can lock you down in man coverage. He has excellent instincts, and he is really tough to deal with at the catch point thanks to his physicality. I think he is going to be productive the moment he steps on an NFL field for the first time this fall. Over the past two seasons, he has 17 pass breakups and three interceptions.

Quinyon Mitchell, CB, Toledo
As much as I like Wiggins, Mitchell is the standard when it comes to cornerbacks in this draft. He has every single trait you want, including size (6-foot, 195 pounds), speed (4.33 in the 40-yard dash) and explosive lower-body power (38-inch vertical jump). And according to his coaches, he is a great teammate. In short, you name it, he can do it.

Mitchell has a silky smooth pedal in off-coverage and great mirror ability in press. His acceleration allows him to close fast in the short/intermediate pass game, but I also see the long speed and ball skills to defend the deep part of the field and create turnovers. Mitchell has six career interceptions and 39 pass breakups. Oh, and did I mention he will set the edge in the run game and not back down against pulling offensive linemen or running backs in the open field? This young man will be Pro Bowler and/or All-Pro within his first two NFL seasons.


My favorite sleepers outside Round 1

DeWayne Carter, DL, Duke

Carter simply never stops. He has the ultimate motor. And his skill set allows him to move up and down the line of scrimmage, rushing from the edge or moving inside to defensive tackle.

At 6-foot-2 and 302 pounds (33-inch arms), he has the physical traits, instincts and scheme recognition to be productive at the point of attack on one-on-one or double-team matchups. Carter plays with good gap control and gets off blocks to make plays against the run. And with a 4.99-second run in the 40, he is quick off the ball in the pass rush. He can run you over with power, work the edge of the center or guard with his sudden hands and feet and finish with his high-end closing speed.

Over the past three seasons, Carter had 80 pressures, 11 sacks, 22 run stops and 19 tackles for loss. He is at his best as a 3-technique defensive tackle in a 4-3 scheme, but he will be successful no matter how he is used in the NFL. Carter is just a damn good football player.

Edgerrin Cooper, LB, Texas A&M
In order to play championship-caliber defense, you must have off-ball linebackers who can play all three downs and diagnose, run sideline to sideline, get off blocks and tackle in space. NFL teams need playmakers up the middle who can read patterns and break on the ball in zone, or stick on running backs and/or tight ends effectively in man coverage. And it helps when you have a linebacker who can blitz and rush the QB with speed and power. Well, Cooper can do all of that and then some.

He is the best off-ball linebacker in the class, and it isn't even a debate in my eyes. At 6-foot-2 and 230 pounds, Cooper has long 34-inch arms and 4.51 speed, making him the prototype second-level defender. He filled the stat sheet in 2023 while at Texas A&M, posting 80 tackles, 8 sacks, 14 tackles for loss and 20 pressures. And I expect him to continue his dominance in 2024 in a key role with an NFL team.

Kamren Kinchens, S, Miami
Winning the turnover battle is the No. 1 priority for every defensive coordinator in the NFL, and Kinchens will help you do just that. No safety in this class has better instincts and anticipation as a deep-field player, whether that be as a single safety in the middle of the field or in a split-safety structure. He is consistently a step ahead of the quarterback with his understanding of route concepts and ability to read the passer's eyes and shoulder leans. But Kinchens also shows the efficient transition mechanics and closing burst to get into position to make game-changing plays; he came down with 11 interceptions over 2022-23.

And on top of the ball skills, the 5-foot-11, 203-pound safety can make the difficult open-field tackles in one-on-one situations (54 last season) and has shown disruptive blitz ability (26 pressures). His 4.65-second 40 time at the combine wasn't ideal, but I'm not too concerned based on what I see on tape. Kinchens has the potential to be a star.

Erick All, TE, Iowa
After Georgia's Brock Bowers, I believe All is the second-best tight end in this draft. And had he not been dealing with back and knee injuries over the past two seasons, I think we'd be talking about All as a Day 1 prospect. He can cause problems for NFL defenses with his size (6-foot-4 and 252 pounds), play speed, blocking ability, excellent route running and surefire hands. All is very explosive both as a blocker at the traditional Y alignment or from the U alignment, but he's much more than that. All can stretch the middle of the field as a receiver, regardless of whether he is set up inside or flexed out as a slot.

The stats won't wow you -- he caught 21 passes for 299 yards and three touchdowns last season -- but his tape is fantastic. And All is super tough after the catch. In fact, 135 of his 299 receiving yards came after the ball was in his hands. It shouldn't be too shocking that we have a good tight end coming out of Iowa (though he was a transfer from Michigan), and I fully expect to see All on the field dominating this fall.

Isaac Guerendo, RB, Louisville
Every year, we see a Day 2/Day 3 pick wind up being a really talented NFL running back for a good team, and everyone asks where he came from. Well, Guerendo is going to be that guy in 2024.

At 6-foot, 221 pounds, he has the skills to be a three-down back. And after dominating at the combine with a 4.33-second run in the 40-yard dash and an eye-popping 41.5-inch vertical jump, it's clear that Guerendo has prototype traits for the position. He plays with a low center of gravity, good change of direction skills, exceptional acceleration and game-breaking top-end speed. And you can see his standout field vision and instincts on tape.

Guerendo ran with better authority and physicality late in the 2023 season than he did in the early-going, helping him finish with 810 rushing yards and 11 touchdowns on the ground. But he can also catch the ball out of the backfield, hauling in 22 passes last season. He still needs to become more physical and nastier in pass protection, but if he turns up the dial on his contact explosiveness to selectively punish linebackers/defensive backs at the second and third levels of the defense, Guerendo will burst onto the scene for some team in 2024.
 

dbair1967

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I think our known list of Top-30 visits has only confirmed at 27. Tomorrow is the deadline for these official visits with draft prospects. Will be interesting to see who the remainder were.
 
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